Our Mission

The Ridgway Center believes that those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. From this starting point, the Center investigates and analyzes past and emerging security problems. It seeks to generate original research and intellectual capital to address the vast array of problems that the US and the international community face.

Matthew B. Ridgway

Matthew B. Ridgway, whose name the center bears, is best remembered for salvaging the United Nation's effort during the Korean War. His military career began in 1917, when the Army commissioned him as a Second Lieutenant immediately after he graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. By 1930, Ridgway had become an advisor to the Governor General of the Philippines, and within a few years, he rose to the rank of Assistant Chief of Staff of the 4th Army.
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Upcoming Events
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Featured Video
WW I Conference: Avoiding a Nuclear Sarajevo

The Matthew B. Ridgway Center’s most recent conference “Avoiding a Nuclear Sarajevo: Lessons from World War I for Crisis Management in the 21st Century,” focuses on the major issues, causes and events leading to the world’s first global conflict.


Recent News
10/17/2016

Dennis Gormley was among an international group of security specialists invited to address the Hague Code of Conduct Regional Seminar held at the University of Jordan, in Amman, on September 28.  The Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation (HCoC) is the only existing multilateral instrument that specifically deals with ballistic missiles.  Since the signing of the HCoC in 2002 at The Hague, the number of subscribing states has increased from 93 to 138.

09/07/2016

Commanding Military Power offers a new explanation of why some armed forces are stronger than others. Ryan Grauer advances a ‘command structure theory’ which combines insights from organization theory, international relations, and security studies literatures to provide a unique perspective on military power. Specifically, armed forces organized to facilitate swift and accurate perception of and response to battlefield developments will cope better with war’s inherent uncertainty, use resources effectively, and, quite often, win. Read more. 

09/02/2016

GSPIA Professor Phil Williams and co-author, Dr. Dighton Fiddner, explore one of the most significant features of cyberspace in their new book: Cyberspace: Malevolent Actors, Criminal Opportunities, and Strategic Competition.  The authors believe that cyberspace is becoming an increasingly risky place for the entire spectrum of users: nation-states, nongovernmental and transnational organizations, commercial enterprises, and individuals. It is also  a space of opportunities—for benevolent, neutral, and malevolent actors. Moreover, the authors identify and assess the challenges and threats to security that can arise in cyberspace because of its unique characteristics both as a distinct strategic domain and as something linked land, air, sea, and space military domains. In the final section, the authors discuss a variety of responses, with some suggesting that the options being pursued most vigorously by the United States are poorly conceived and ill-suited to the tasks at hand. Read more.

07/15/2016

Planners and evaluators must try to anticipate how threats and operating environments will change during a deployment. Accurately defining expected threats and resourcing the military to counter them is the sine qua non of military readiness. As threats and operational environments rapidly evolve, they make it harder to define, measure, and produce the desired levels of military readiness.

05/24/2016

GSPIA alumni Chad Serena (PhD '10), a political scientist, and Colin Clarke (PhD, '12), an associate political scientist at the RAND Corporation, recently produced two editorials published by Reuters.  In their article, “A new kind of battlefield awaits the U.S. military – megacities,” they write on the growing trend of warfare in cities, especially in cities with a population of ten million or greater, and explore the unique challenges that urban combat presents.  They argue that in order to adapt to new battlefields and defeat violent non-state actors while protecting civilians, improvements in monitoring, collecting, and interpreting data are imperative.

Ridgway Research & Analysis
Featured Publications
Missile Contagion Cruise Missile Proliferation and the Threat to International Security
Most books on missile proliferation focus on the spread of ballistic missiles or cruise missiles, not both. Gormley’s work explains why cruise missiles are beginning to spread widely, but does so by explaining their spread in the context of ballistic missile proliferation.
Featured Alumni
John

Picarelli, ’97, is a program manager for transnational issues at the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research and development branch of the U.S. Department of Justice. Picarelli focuses on transnational, organized crime, human trafficking and terrorism, among others, and how and how they impact criminal justice sectors at the federal, state, and local levels in the United States.

 
 

Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies
3930 Wesley W. Posvar Hall, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260
412.624.7884